So What’s the Business?

So far I haven’t given much of an indication as to what the business is going to be. That is intentional as I plan to build up to that as I build the business. But I will give you some hints as to what my idea is and I will definitely detail how I plan to build it.

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The business will initially be strictly online and something that anyone can find something to enjoy, learn from, and even profit from. It’ll also give you a way to give to your favorite charities or other non-profit organizations in a very creative way that will entice others to give as well.

Given the business will be online, I obviously have a website to build! Good thing I’ve been involved in that kind of work for quite a while now. But the tools I plan to use are very new, some are just being made available and not fully mature. Why would I risk a new business on untested technology?

As the name of this blog reveals, I am bootstrapping this new business. What exactly does that mean? I am not getting any outside funding, its all what I can put into it myself and what I can earn from it that will keep it going.

As a result, I need to keep expenses as minimal as possible. With a website there are definite costs, such as hosting, scaling, storage, support, etc. These costs can vary quite a bit, so how to minimize?

Hosting on Home Servers Option

I could do what used to be done, buy or build my own server and host it at home. I’d have total control over it but then I’d also be the sole support of it. Also what happens as the business grows (hopefully)? Do I buy more servers to allow it to scale, more storage as the needs grow? Where does that end?

Maybe this would be something I would want to do eventually when the business can afford to operate its own infrastructure with full support and personnel, but that is a long way off. There has to be something else.

Hosting on the Cloud Option

How about the cloud? This is a mature technology now and I have had multiple years of experience working in it. There is no equipment to buy or maintain, just pay for the virtual machines and services that you use. Someone else makes sure it is always up and running and is there to help when you need it, plus you can automate it to quickly scale as the load fluctuates. I wouldn’t want my website going down right when its getting busy or running at full capacity when no one is on it.

This sounds much better but there is a small problem. When you create virtual servers in the cloud to host your application, you pay for it 24 x 7, as long as it is running and you ALWAYS want it running. As your business grows you’ll need more servers, and that cost will increase. Is there any way to get these costs down?

The Serverless Option

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What is serverless? Does this mean hosting computers without a server? NO! It does not. You still have to have a server, hopefully multiples of them as your business is booming. What it means is that the details of the server are abstracted away from you. You no longer have to manage it, you don’t have to handle the scaling, you just have to use it (and of course monitor it).

And you only pay for exactly what you use!! If no one is visiting your site (hopefully that’ll never happen) then you don’t pay for it to be there. It’ll still be there when someone visits.

But to get the full benefit of this technology you have to design your site to take advantage of it. The old monolith apps of days gone by (well, today still) won’t give you any benefit. It’s all about microservices baby!

I’m going to delve into each of these topics over the coming weeks, and also talk about a couple of conferences I attended to learn about all of this: ServerlessConf and OSCON.

For now though I have to finish packing. I have to head to the airport in an hour! Have a wonderful Memorial Day weekend everyone!

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  1. Pingback: Hosting on Amazon Web Services (AWS) | Bootstrapping a Startup

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